Brian O'Neil - RE/MAX Advantage I



Posted by Brian O’Neil on 7/15/2019


41 Amesbury St, Worcester, MA 01605

Single-Family

$179,900
Price

5
Rooms
2
Beds
1
Baths
Two bedroom bungalow with level yard on quiet dead end street. Hardwood floors, updated heating system. Room for expansion on second floor with bonus room and open attic. Great opportunity for rehab or investor.
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses

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Categories: New Homes  


Posted by Brian O’Neil on 7/15/2019

This Single-Family in Holden, MA recently sold for $310,000. This Ranch style home was sold by Brian O’Neil - RE/MAX Advantage I.


53 Avery Heights Dr, Holden, MA 01520

Single-Family

$309,000
Price
$310,000
Sale Price

7
Rooms
3
Beds
2/1
Full/Half Baths
Over-sized 1512 sqft, 3 BR, 2.5 bath Ranch located on a corner lot in sought after Holden neighborhood. This home offers many great features for its new owner(s): *Newer Heating system and oil tank (both approx 3 years old). Newer garage and exterior doors. *Updated eat-in kitchen with painted cabinets, newer appliances, tile counters & backslash. *Hardwood floors throughout most of the home. Master bedroom with with full bath. *Spacious Living Rm/Dining Rm combo with fireplace. *Finished walkout lower level with fireplace. *2 Car garage. Truly a great value for a ranch of this size & price in Holden!

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Categories: Sold Homes  


Posted by Brian O’Neil on 7/14/2019

During warmer weather, you probably don’t think much about your heating bill. But when you don’t need it is the best time to make changes and upgrades to your home so that throughout winter, you can live in blissful warmth. Some changes, such as exchanging your old single-pane windows for those double or triple panes with low U-factors, or mitigating drafts, leaks, and gaps should be top of the list. But, if you really want to make a difference in your energy bill, read up on passive building principles.

Passive building concept

Using building science, the five main principles of passive building techniques give measurable, efficient use of energy. Builders joined with scientists from the US and Canada way back in the 1970s to develop the original principles using funding from the US Department of Energy and the Canadian government. In the next decade, German and other northern European scientists and builders added more information. Distilled for current use, they are:

  • Continuous insulation throughout the building’s “envelope” (the weather, air and thermal barriers).
  • Creates an airtight envelope to keep outside air from entering and conditioned air (heated or cooled) from escaping.
  • High-performance windows allow in light but mitigate temperature transference.
  • Heating and cooling systems utilize heat and moisture-recovery ventilation and “minimal-space” air conditioning.
  • Exploits the sun’s energy for light and heat but minimizes solar impact during cooling.

How it works

The exceptionally snug insulation and design strategies use the heat from appliances and the home’s occupants to keep the indoor temperatures steady through all four seasons and in each weather condition. It does this by constant mechanical filtration to keep the air quality high. This mixture of insulation and continuous low-level filtration prevents mildew and mold spores from establishing and growing inside the home.

This type of construction especially benefits allergy prone-family members or those with respiratory illnesses.

To receive passive house certification, the design must have high R-value insulation and demonstrably less (90% less) energy required for heat. Overall energy use must be 60 to 70 percent lower compared to similar-sized standard code-built homes.

Other features contributing to the passive energy savings include flat-paneled rooftop solar water heating systems that typically heat water to between 99 and 140 degrees, even in cloudy weather. Other passive homes include the use of wood heat for the coldest of winter days.

Metal roofing, especially in snow-prone areas, allows snow to slide off the roof, and utilizing covered porches and patios protects the home’s entrances from rain and snow buildup.

If you’re interested in a certified energy efficient home. Let your real estate professional know so that the houses you see fit your requirements.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Brian O’Neil on 7/7/2019

Trendy lofts evoke visions of converted warehouses filled with artists and musicians living and working in shared space, forgoing modern conveniences for Bohemian communal living. Modern lofts, however, have more to offer than exposed brick, industrial elevators, and visible pipes. In fact, the term “loft” might appear in marketing for anything from remodeled warehouses to revitalized historic apartment buildings and newly constructed high-rises in urban areas

The appeal of loft living

No one demographic has the corner on loft living. Young professionals look for proximity to work, nightlife, and recreation while empty-nesters want to reduce the requirements for upkeep, yard work, and maintenance. In both urban and smaller community downtown/uptown settings, loft-style housing offers easy access to shopping, medical care, theatres, and public transportation. When the distance from work to home to recreation and nightlife decreases, the opportunity to experience events and socialize with workmates and friends increases.

An advantage of live-work loft-style housing is the sense of camaraderie and shared interests with the other residents.

Choosing a loft style

With the growth in popularity of loft living, actual warehouse and commercial loft conversions cannot meet the demand. Industrial lofts no longer make up the bulk of loft offerings on the market. So-called “soft lofts”—new construction in the style of a converted loft—has all the modern amenities, energy-savings, and conveniences of other newly-built housing that replicates some features and atmosphere of traditional lofts. These newer buildings take advantage of lower cost utilities with energy-efficient windows, insulation, and heating and cooling systems. Many soft-lofts install surfaces made from recycled glass, wood, and plastic or use renewable resources.

Different from the completely open-concept industrial loft space, modern loft models have built-in closets and walled bedrooms but typically offer completely open living spaces, high windows, and even exposed ductwork to give the loft aesthetic.

Another type of “loft” is the revitalized historic building. Sometimes it’s a hotel past its glory days. It could be a former library or office building. Perhaps an aging residential building needed a new life. If living in a bit of history appeals to you, this type of loft should be on your list. Typically, much of the original architectural detail remains including marble columns with decorative capitals, soaring ceilings, marble or hardwood flooring, vintage elevators, leaded glass windows, and sweeping staircases. New to these buildings you’ll find upscale appliances set in gourmet kitchens, upgraded bathrooms, and secure entries. 

To learn about loft conversions or soft-loft buildings available in your area, contact a local real estate expert.




Tags: homebuyers   home trends  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Brian O’Neil on 7/2/2019

This Single-Family in Worcester, MA recently sold for $215,000. This Ranch style home was sold by Brian O’Neil - RE/MAX Advantage I.


3 Oakview St, Worcester, MA 01604

Single-Family

$200,000
Price
$215,000
Sale Price

6
Rooms
3
Beds
1
Baths
6 room, 3 bedroom, 1 bath ranch with level, manicured yard, large patio with granite steps, and new shed. Recent updates include furnace, oil tank, water heater, and many more inside and out. Great commuter location with access to routes 290 and 9, and minutes from UMass Medical School. ***Showings start at Open House on Sunday 12-2pm***

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Categories: Sold Homes